The Edison

The Edison, that you can find in the basement of the Higgins Building in LA, was once home to the city’s first power station. Built by brass-baron Thomas Higgins, who had a dream: to move downtown to LA’s then-vacant west part, where Wall Street West is today. Of course, the center of the city was to be his own building, sporting all advances of science: lightning-quick electric elevators, lighting, clean running water.

Gerald Butler in NY

Thirteen-foot-tall mahogany doors with a knocker that could summon the dead. A ceiling fresco depicting the rape of Ganymede. Plaster walls chipped and mottled with age, massive columns supporting limestone lions, crystal chandeliers casting spidery shadows…. Medieval castle? Ancestral manor house? Try a two-story loft in the heart of New York’s ultratrendy Chelsea district.

Industrial revolution

When she first saw this old, derelict textile factory in the centre of Barcelona, interior designer Cristina Rodriguez wasn’t even fazed – she knew that eventually it would be her home, and how right she was…

This was once a buzzing, thriving factory where people came to work day after day to produce fabrics and textiles. The huge space could have been daunting but, instead of feeling negative about it, Cristina plunged into a whirl of ideas and thoughts about how to make this vast area into various living zones without adding partitions or walls.

Wynkoop Loft

This great-looking loft in Denver, Colorado was designed to reflect the owner’s passion for automobiles. The designer who handled this design is Beaton Design. The challenge was to create a comfortable space that would reflect a strong passion for exotic automobiles in its lines, form and detailing.

Industrial Modern in San Francisco

The striking Oriental Warehouse Loft by Edmonds + Lee Architects is a modern architectural residence in the South Beach neighborhood of San Francisco. To maximize the space inside the residence, the designers chose to abandon the general rules of maintaining privacy with regard to windows and transparency. Instead, the home opens up to nature with large expanses of glass to blend the inside and outside world.

Futuristic loft

Patrick Tighe Architects have created this 1400 square foot loft, located in a warehouse building in downtown Los Angeles. The live-work environment was designed for a creative professional. Two distinct entities are evident in the design. The angular geometry of the faceted stone clad monolith stands in contrast to the free flowing organic elliptical shaped room.

Wedge Loft

Just as one of the previous ones, this one is designed by Ike Kligerman Barkley architects. I’ve found it on the architects’ site, not too much is known about it apart from the description.

The open loft space splays out to fifty feet at the far end, while the roof‘s angular trajectory culminates in a 24 foot wall of glass through which southern light pours in to illuminate the space.